Link

Explaining WhatsApp’s Encryption for Business Communications

Shoshana Wodinsky writing for Gizmodo has a lengthy, and detailed, breakdown of how and why WhatsApp is modifying its terms of service to facilitate consumer-to-business communications. The crux of the shift, really, comes down to:

… in the years since WhatsApp co-founders Jan Koum and Brian Acton cut ties with Facebook for, well, being Facebook, the company slowly turned into something that acted more like its fellow Facebook properties: an app that’s kind of about socializing, but mostly about shopping. These new privacy policies are just WhatsApp’s—and Facebook’s—way of finally saying the quiet part out loud.

What’s going to change? Namely whenever you’re speaking to a business then those communications will not be considered end-to-end encrypted and, as such, the communications content and metadata that is accessible can be used for advertising and other marketing, data mining, data targeting, or data exploitation purposes. If you’re just chatting with individuals–that is, not businesses!–then your communications will continue to be end-to-end encrypted.

For an additional, and perhaps longer, discussion of how WhatsApp’s shifts in policy–now, admittedly, delayed for a few months following public outrage–is linked to the goal of driving business revenue into the company check out Alec Muffett’s post over on his blog. (By way of background, Alec’s been in the technical security and privacy space for 30+ years, and is a good and reputable voice on these matters.)