Solved: Changed Name Server and Apple Custom Email Domain Stopped Working

Photo by Miguel u00c1. Padriu00f1u00e1n on Pexels.com

I recently moved a self-hosted WordPress website from a shared hosting environment to WordPress.com. The migration was smooth: I had to export the XML for the self-hosted WordPress installation and import it to the WordPress.com CMS, and then fix a few images. The website is functioning well and the transition was smooth.

However, shortly after doing so I started having issues with receiving emails at my custom email which was set up with Apple’s iCloud Custom Email Domain. Not good!

The Problem

I changed the name servers with the domain registrar (e.g., Bluehost or Dreamhost) so that my custom domain (e.g., example.com) would point to the WordPress.com infrastructure. However, in doing so my custom email (user@example.com) that was using Apple’s iCloud Custom Email Domain stopped sending or receiving email.

This problem was surfaced because email could not be sent/received and, also, I could not verify its domain in Apple’s “Custom Email Domain”. Specifically, iCloud presented the dialogue message “Verifying your domain. This usually takes a few minutes but could take up to 24 hours. You’ll be able to continue when verification is complete.” The “Reverify” button, below the dialogue, was greyed out.

Background

When you have registered the domain with a registrar other than WordPress (e.g., Bluehost, Dreamhost, etc) and then host a website with WordPress.com you will have to update the name servers the domain uses. So, you will need to log into your registrar and point the name servers at the registrar to NS1.Wordpress.com, NS2.Wordpress.com, and NS3.Wordpress.com. In doing so, all the custom DNS information you have provided to your registrar, and which has been used to direct email to a third-party email provider such as Apple and iCloud, will cease to work.

The Solution

When transitioning to using WordPress’ nameservers you will need to re-enter custom domain information in WordPress’ domain management tabs. Specifically, you will need to add the relevant CNAME, TXT, and A records.1 This will entail the following:

  1. Log into your WordPress.com website, and navigate to: Upgrades >> Domains
  2. Select the domain for which you want to modify the DNS information
  3. Select “DNS Records” >> Manage
  4. Select “Add Record” (Upper right hand corner)
  5. Enter the information which is provided to you by your email provider

Apple iCloud Custom Domain and WordPress.com

When setting up your custom domain with Apple you will be provided with a set of TXT, MX, and CNAME records to add. Apple also provides the requisite field information in a help document.

While most of these records are self evident, when adding the DKIM (CNAME record-type) record in WordPress.com, the Host listed on Apple’s website is entered in the “Name” field on WordPress’ “Add a Record” page. The “Value” of the DKIM on Apple’s website is entered as the “value” on WordPress’ site.

TypeNameValue
CNAMEsig1._domainkeysig1.dkim.example.com.at.icloudmailadmin.com
Visualization of Adding iCloud CNAME Record for WordPress.com


Note: Apple will generate a new TXT record to verify you control the domain after pointing the name servers to WordPress.com. This record will look something like “apple-domain=[random set of upper/lower case letters and numbers]”. You cannot use the “apple-domain=“ field that was used in setting up your custom email information with your original registrar’s DNS records. You must use the new “apple-domain=“ field information when updating your WordPress.com DNS records.

Once you’ve made the needed changes with WordPress.com, and re-verified your domain with Apple’s iCloud Custom Domains, your email should continue working.

In the Future

It would be great if WordPress actively and clearly communicated to users who are pointing their name servers to WordPress.com that there is a need to immediately also update and add email-related DNS records. I appreciate that not all customers may require this information, but proactively and forcefully sharing this information would ensure that their customers are not trying to fix broken email while simultaneously struggling to identify what problem actuallyy needs to be resolved.


  1. WordPress does have a support page to help users solve this. ↩︎

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